A timely article in Inside Higher Ed shows there may be movement in other areas on this question.  The Common Application and Universal College Application are changing how they phrase the gender question.

 

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/04/26/common-application-and-universal-college-application-move-beyond-giving-applicants

 

Here at Graceland, we’re working on adding an “Oher” field with a  text box for free response in our data system. If our process is not too far along, I may see if we can examine how the CA and UCA are handling this, and adapt to our purposes.

 


GULeftJames J. Uhlenkamp, Ed.D., Director of Institutional Research
Graceland University, 1 University Place, Lamoni, IA 50140
uhlenkam@graceland.edu
641-784-5221


http://www.graceland.edu/about-gu/images/social-icons-facebook.png  http://www.graceland.edu/about-gu/images/social-icons-twitter.png  http://www.graceland.edu/about-gu/images/social-icons-youtube.png  http://www.graceland.edu/about-gu/images/social-icons-instagram.png

 

 

 

From: Lowe, Peter [mailto:plowe@unf.edu]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 5:28 PM
To: Common Data Set <cds@collegeboard.lyris.net>
Subject: RE: [cds] Transgender reporting

 

“if a campus has 4,782 students, and the M/F answers total 4,775, then what is it that really falls apart out there in our reporting world? I would argue that nothing really does.”

 

With all due respect, That would affect almost every IPEDS survey that collects student related data (Fall Enrollment, Admissions, 12-month enrollment, Completions, and Graduation Rates).   I expect that each schools executive administration would also want credit for every student in their reporting.  One could suggest adding “Other” as a quick solution.  But If the decision is made to add gender/sex categories beyond “other”, with the expanding evolution of gender/sex identity categories or the confusion as to the sex vs gender debate, how can one predict where it will end? 

 

The one thing we need to keep in mind is the consistency of our comparative data over time and what the implications are if one deviates from the national established approach.  Yes, there are probably some justifiable internal uses for the data, but are students willing to reveal such personal information and trust that it will be protected and used for reasons they approve of?  The key driver for all intuitions collecting and reporting data is mandatory external reporting requirements (Title IV reporting requirements, etc. ) and deviating from the national historic standard can/will create significant impact on a schools historic data/trend comparisons.  I think many of us have experienced a small taste of this with the 2010 ethnicity/race changes.     

 

I personally believe there is a fine line between reporting on the institutions student progress and drilling down to the level of tracking students by micro-groups.   Do we start asking for the individuals eye color as well? (A reference Jane Elliotts Brown eyes vs. Blue Eyes experiment).   How far is too far?

 

There is an increased sensitivity today than ever before, about the collection of personal/identifying data on individuals and the protection of that privacy.  Asking students and staff, personal information that is not required or that does not pertain to their education/work, could create unnecessary backlash within each institution.

 

I fully understand/respect that people from different offices will look at data differently, but it does make a difference when you work daily with 5 and 10 year historic comparisons.

 

Respectfully

 

Peter B. Lowe
Coordinator of Institutional Research
Office of Institutional Research and Assessment
University of North Florida
904.620.2606 Ph
904.620.2322 Fax

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Jim Rawlins [mailto:jrawlins@uoregon.edu]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 12:58 PM
To: Common Data Set <cds@collegeboard.lyris.net>
Subject: RE: [cds] Transgender reporting

 

Just my .02, but I’ll say it’s disappointing that the Department of Education is suggesting that schools take their best guess or otherwise proportionately, or even randomly (!) assign gender to someone.  (Can you imagine if someone suggested that with race questions? They actually did that in K-12 for the longest time, but have stopped that practice of having an administrator essentially peek in a classroom, and make their own conclusion based on the appearance of the student.)  Even if the question of how reporting should be updated to account for transgender, gender-fluid and other students is complicated – and it definitely is – it would seem that a much more appropriate solution from ED in the interim would be that of simply no longer requiring the M/F totals to add up perfectly to the same total as enrollment. 

 

In other words, if a campus has 4,782 students, and the M/F answers total 4,775, then what is it that really falls apart out there in our reporting world? I would argue that nothing really does. But when you make guesses on those seven students, you’re essentially having to ignore, disregard, or change their answers. At best, that’s missing the opportunity to know; at worst, it could make the student feel like there was a bait-and-switch in having allowed them to answer differently when asked. Allowing institutions to report a slightly lower total could have the benefit of starting to illustrate the size of this group.  If you think that you have a good few students simply forget to answer, and wouldn’t want the two confused, then that’s a great counterargument to my idea, of course; I’m just musing out loud here. But if you do offer a third option, and require answers, then this would let you have a way to illustrate what you’ve learned, if only indirectly.

 

------------------------------

Jim Rawlins

Assistant Vice President for Enrollment Management

Director of Admissions

University of Oregon

272 Oregon Hall

Eugene, OR 97403-1217

http://admissions.uoregon.edu

 

From: Fields, Jeffrey M [mailto:Fieldsj@rowan.edu]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 9:23 AM
To: Common Data Set <cds@collegeboard.lyris.net>
Subject: RE: [cds] Transgender reporting

 

Wikipedia actually has a pretty well written entry for sex and gender distinction: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex_and_gender_distinction

 

Jeffrey

 

Jeffrey Fields

Data Standards Analyst

Office of Analytics, Systems & Applications

Rowan University, Memorial Hall

856.256.4412 fieldsj@rowan.edu

 

From: Darren Orange [mailto:darren.orange@sourcebooks.com]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 12:03 PM
To: Common Data Set
Subject: RE: [cds] Transgender reporting

 

Hi,

 

According to Webster both ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ have the same first definition which is “the state of being male or female”

 

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sex

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gender

 

 

From: Jenna Stone [mailto:jestone@clarkson.edu]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 10:56 AM
To: Common Data Set <
cds@collegeboard.lyris.net>
Cc: Common Data Set <
cds@collegeboard.lyris.net>
Subject: Re: [cds] Transgender reporting

 

I think there is some confusion going on regarding the collection and reporting of 'sex' vs. 'gender'.  They are not the same thing...

 

Jenna S. Stone

Associate Director for Institutional Research
Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

(315) 268-3790 | jestone@clarkson.edu | IR Website

 

 

 

On Mon, Apr 25, 2016 at 11:41 AM, Ana Landrón Arana <alandron@sanjuanciudadpatria.com> wrote:

Great explanation, Bonnie!  That's what we do at our institution, too.  Students decide.  If blank, we also follow the same procedure: name and then statistical proportion.

Prof. Ana Inés Landrón Arana
Directora
Colegio Universitario de San Juan
Oficina de Planificación, Investigación
Institucional y Recursos Externos
787-480-2373
alandron@sanjuanciudadpatria.com



-----Original Message-----
From: Bonnie M. Smyth-McGaha [mailto:bmsmyth@asub.edu]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 11:34 AM
To: Common Data Set <cds@collegeboard.lyris.net>
Subject: RE: [cds] Transgender reporting

I do not want to create new race categories at my school.  The reason is because at this point in time, we are only allowed to report students to the state (at least in my state) and feds as either male or female.  I let students self-identify either male or female.  I don't question their choice or ask for any verification.   And, of course, students have the option of skipping and reporting neither gender.  Here's why I think that is the best approach--if I create any other gender categories, I then have to use my own judgement to report those students as either male or female.  And I don't think I am the best person to make that choice.  I think the student is the best person to make that choice.  If there is some ambiguity about a student's gender, then I am going to let the student choose his/her gender.  If I were to allow alternate gender choices for my students, then it would be up to me to determine which of those alternate choices I would report as male and which ones I would report as female.  Again, this just makes it more complicated when I could just let students say if they are male or female.

If a student leaves the gender blank, I then go by what IPEDS says are common methods.  First, I look at names to help me guess the gender.  If that doesn't help, I assign gender for reporting purposes based on my school's known gender distribution.

The only reason I can see for me to create new gender categories is if my institution is going to treat some students differently  in terms of services offered based on their gender.  If my school ever sees the need to offer additional organized services to transgender students, for example, then I would consider asking students to self-identify as transgender.  I think even then, though, I would likely ask that as a separate question from the male/female gender question.  At this point, we have promoted the various services offered through our Student Success Center in ways that I feel transgender students would feel comfortable seeking any necessary assistance there.


 ​​
Bonnie Smyth-McGaha |  Director
Institutional Research
Arkansas State University-Beebe
1000 Iowa Street, Beebe, AR  72012
(501) 882-8826 | bmsmyth@asub.edu
www.asub.edu | #asubeebe
“Transforming Lives Through Quality Learning Experiences”​


-----Original Message-----
From: Tarji Kinsey [mailto:kinseyt@erau.edu]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 10:04 AM
To: Common Data Set
Subject: [cds] Transgender reporting

Hi et al.
Please lend any guidance re: creating categories (other than male/female/unknown) for transgender students and how they might be rolled up into those categories for reporting.

Scenario: Student A is born a male, yet chooses to identify as a female or as unknown.

Please share: 1) How you would report these students to IPEDS considering IPEDS leaves it to the institution to decide and 2) What category (ex. male/female/other or male/female/unknown) in your data collection would you use to capture this student.

Also, attached (and below) is the only guidance/FAQ I have from the IPEDS help desk:

From: IPEDS Email [mailto:ipedshelp@rti.org]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 10:51 AM
To: Kinsey, Tarji R. <KINSEYT@erau.edu>
Cc: IPEDS Email <ipedshelp@rti.org>
Subject: IPEDS Gender Unknown 88g2061*


1)My institution has students and/or staff for which gender is unknown.  Since there is no place to report "gender unknown" on the IPEDS data collection screens, how should we report these individuals?

These individuals are still to be reported to IPEDS, even though their gender is unknown.  It is up to the institution to decide how best to handle reporting individuals whose gender is unknown.  However, common methods used are: allocate the individuals with gender unknown based on the known distribution of men and women at the institution for either students or staff; use the individual's name to assign gender; assign gender randomly.

Thanks in advance,
Tarji R. Kinsey
Data Reporting Manager, Institutional Research
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
600 S. Clyde Morris Blvd.
Daytona Beach, FL  32114
386.226.6227 (office)
kinseyt@erau.edu

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